Preserving Kona's Stories

Pū‘olo: The Gifts We Bring

Pū‘olo: The Gifts We Bring

Now on display inside the H.N. Greenwell Store Museum

OPEN HOURS:

Monday, Tuesday and Thursday, 10am to 2pm

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The final days to experience the Pūʿolo exhibit have arrived as Thursday, June 27th will be the final day of the exhibit.

Open since last December, thousands of guests have visited the exhibit which explores Kona’s cultural diversity through the concept that the diverse people who call Kona their “home” brought—and continue to bring—their “gifts,” which, among many things, include knowledge, traditions and values.

The exhibit venue will be closed on July 1st and re-open on July 29th as the H.N. Greenwell Store Museum exhibit which presents the Store as it was in the 1890s.

Through historical photographs and artifacts showcased alongside contemporary artworks from three Kona artists, “Pū‘olo: The Gifts We Bring” will illustrate a deeply significant Hawaiian concept, also shared by many cultures, of the importance of taking a gift when one travels, and being prepared to express one’s respect and appreciation in the form of a pūʿolo, a small package or bundle. Artwork, oral histories, photos and artifacts reflecting Native Hawaiian, Japanese, Portuguese, Filipino, Chinese, and English heritage appear alongside each other to illustrate a tapestry of cultures that create Kona’s unique sense of place.

In addition to photographs and artifacts from Kona Historical Society’s rich archive and collections that will be on display, this exhibit will showcase artwork from three artists deeply rooted in Kona’s districts. From Holualoa, Artists Hiroki Morinoue and his daughter Miho Morinoue will contribute a mixed media piece reflecting their Japanese heritage. Captain Cook Artist Gerald Lucena will present a fiber piece, made with locally sourced materials, gathered from the Kona districts. Artist and Cultural Practitioner Conall Kahaka‘io Ravenscraft from South Kona will be contributing a sculpture carved from native wood that expresses the personal relationship he has with his home.